NEWS

Union Busting on Campus: Jackson Lewis and Higher Education Anti-Unionism

In response to staff at the University of New Mexico unionising, the university have brought in lawyers from the notorious union-busting law firm Jackson Lewis. In this article, David Correia, associate professor at the university, discussing the current state of higher education in the US and the long history of anti-union activities.

From 2008 to 2018, few professors at the University of New Mexico—whether tenured, tenure-track, or adjunct—received wage increases greater than the cost of living. In most of those years, wages remained stagnant, while out-of-pocket costs for health insurance and retirement contributions increased. As a result, some professors, particularly those faculty who teach on semester-to-semester contracts, make less today than they did ten years ago. Median salaries for UNM faculty, already low at all ranks and dramatically low in comparison to similar universities, continue to shrink.

Last week, after years of on-campus organizing, UNM faculty filed with the local labor board to form a faculty union. Nearly 1,000 faculty signed union authorization cards. If we win the election, the more than 1,700 faculty at UNM’s will be able to collectively bargain with UNM over wages and working conditions.

As any educator working in higher education knows, faculty working conditions are student learning conditions. A decade of steep cuts have convinced many faculty that UNM leadership isn’t serious about its mission. Endless austerity has shrunk the university. Year after year, UNM balances its books on the backs of faculty, staff and students. According to UNM’s interim provost in a February 13 email to all faculty, declining state support and an even sharper decline in enrollments over the past five years have cratered UNM’s budget. Revenue at UNM’s main campus “is now about $24 million less than it was in 2009.”

But last week faculty learned once again that fiscal austerity at UNM, like at most institutions of higher education, only applies to faculty and staff salaries and the university’s academic mission. In response to the faculty union effort, the University of New Mexico hired the notorious union-busting law firm Jackson Lewis. According to Steven Greenhouse of theNew York Times, Jackson Lewis “is widely known as one of the most aggressively anti-union law firms in the U.S.” It was founded in 1958 and today employs more than 900 attorneys in 58 offices in 37 states, with offices also in Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.

In the ten years since UNM gave its faculty even a cost-of-living raise, revenues at Jackson Lewis have more than doubled, from $196 million in 2008 to $420 million in 2018. In other words, as real wages have declined for workers in higher education, particularly for faculty at UNM, revenues at the company that invented what it calls “union avoidance” have skyrocketed.

The university has not said what it will pay Jackson Lewis. But when the University of New Hampshire hired Jackson Lewis last year to oppose faculty union organizing there, the university, a public institution similar to UNM, paid the firm nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

Jackson Lewis is not just any law firm. It is big business’s go-to firm for anti-union campaigns. They’ve represented thousands of employers, including large retailers such as Ikea, manufacturers such as IBM and Boeing, and health care firms from coast to coast. In the past decade, it has moved aggressively into public-sector higher education union busting. In recent years, in addition to UNH and now UNM, it has represented Barnard College, Emerson College, Northeastern University, Middlesex County College, Columbia College, and NYU among others. College administrators hire Jackson Lewis for the same reasons for-profit employers do: to bargain to impasse with existing unions, or, in the case of UNM, to stop unions from being formed in the first place.

Jackson Lewis charges its clients hundreds of thousands of dollars—in some cases millions of dollars—because it’s good at what it does. Its two founders got their start at a firm called Labor Relations Associates of Chicago, Inc. (LRA), which was founded in 1939 by Nathan Shefferman, a man labor historians consider the father of the “union avoidance industry.” Shefferman got his start when Sears and Roebuck hired him to oppose efforts by Sears retail clerks to unionize. Shefferman parlayed that experience into LRA, which had hundreds of clients by the 1940s. According to Professor John Logan, a prominent labor historian, “LRA consultants committed numerous illegal actions, including bribery, coercion of employees and racketeering. Congressional hearings into its activities effectively forced LRA out of business in the late 1950s. But the firm provided a training ground for other union avoidance gurus such as Louis Jackson and Robert Lewis of the law firm Jackson Lewis.”

What do you get when you hire Jackson Lewis? Jackson Lewis doesn’t just advise and consult for its clients. As Logan told a reporter, Jackson Lewis runs the entire anti-union campaign. It “basically runs the entire show,” Logan explained. “They’re writing speeches, training supervisors, making video and websites to convey the anti-union message. They script everything.”

There are thousands of law firms in the U.S. that do management-side labor law, and most do it much cheaper than Jackson Lewis, and most do not bend and break the law like Jackson Lewis. When a company or university hires Jackson Lewis, it’s because of its specialty at no-holds-barred anti-unionism. As Professor Logan told me when we talked on the phone, “you don’t hire Jackson Lewis if you want an agreement with a union or you want to respect your employees right to unionize. You hire them for their hardball tactics.” You hire Jackson Lewis if you want to delay an NLRB election, as UNM is now doing. You hire Jackson Lewis for their success in “undermining union campaigns.”

Jackson Lewis is in-demand by university administrators because of its reputation, not despite of it. And Jackson Lewis’s reputation is as notorious as its origins. During union organizing at the New York Daily News, Jackson Lewis posted armed guards at factory gates in multiple states to stop union organizing efforts. It directs companies to set up forced overtime when union meetings are scheduled, as it did with Ikea. It threatens workers, as it did in its notorious, and illegal, EnerSys campaign. It intercepts the distribution of union material. It places negative stories about union officials in tabloid newspapers. It operates in a legal gray area, explained Professor Logan, and considers the subsequent legal penalties the cost of doing business. Breaking the law is part of its overall anti-union strategy. Labor busting used to be the domain of Pinkerton goons in jackboots. Now it’s right-wing lawyers in Brioni suits.

And labor busting today is not just a partisan obsession among the political right. Jackson Lewis has emerged in the past few years as a major contributor to Democratic political candidates. During the 2016 election cycle, Jackson Lewis’s political action committee handed out more than $70,000 to federal candidates. More than 60 percent of those donations went to Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), and Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris (D-CA).

The University of New Mexico, according to Professor Logan, will most likely deny it’s familiar with Jackson Lewis’s reputation and claim it just needs legal representation. The latter might be true, he said, but the former is most certainly not. “The university will claim this is just a legal process and Jackson Lewis is well regarded, but it’s quite clear that most of the time, when you hire Jackson Lewis, it’s to take a hard line.” And it will be expensive. A basic anti-union campaign, as the one UNM is clearly gearing up to fight, “will cost at least a few hundred thousand dollars. It could be less, but Jackson Lewis isn’t the firm you hire if you have a budget in mind.”

While universities like UNM continue to disinvest in the academic mission, publicly-funded union busting gets a blank check.

David Correia is an associate professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Properties of Violence: Law and Land Grant Struggle in Northern New Mexico and Police: a Field Guide.

https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4267-union-busting-on-campus-jackson-lewis-and-higher-education-anti-unionism

“A Semi-Autobiographical Response…” at Union College

http://www.backstreets.com/news.html
SPANISH HARLEM REVISITED
The spirit of Bruce Springsteen returns to Union College  

Nearly 45 years ago, Bruce Springsteen played Union College in Schenectady, NY, and his spirit came back to town last night in a new form. Union College Department of Theatre and Dance presented  When The Promise Was Broken, short plays inspired by the songs of Bruce Springsteen, running through the weekend. The original collection features 13 short plays written by various playwrights, each taking an individual Springsteen song as inspiration.

For last night's official premiere, nine of these plays were performed, included Valhalla Correctional, inspired by "We Take Care of Our Own"; Bloody River, inspired by "American Skin (41 Shots)"; Object Permanence, inspired by "Terry's Song"; Drive All Night, inspired by "Drive All Night"; A Semi-Autobiographical Response…, inspired by "I'm on Fire"; Gospel Hour, inspired by "State Trooper"; Merry-Go-Round, inspired by "Cover Me"; Pick Up Beds, inspired by "When You're Alone," and Glad For the Company, inspired by "Nebraska."

Yulman Theatre is an intimate venue, seating fewer than than 100 patrons.  Pre-show music featured music by Springsteen and included "Your Own Worst Enemy," "Sugarland," and "This Hard Land." As the performances began, each play either began or ended with the song it was inspired by. The acting was excellent, and the rapid-fire pace of each act kept the evening moving along.  

The theme of each play did vary, with some representing a song fairly literally, and others that required a bit more thought to discover the connection. None of these short performances recreated the lyrics word-for-word in live action — the key phrase is "inspired by." The Magic Rat driving his sleek machine was not to be seen. 

In fact, some of the characters may not exist at all: while a protagonist in Drive All Night seemed real enough at first, two women in the play wind up debating whether he was just an image they had created, one they wanted to be true. In "Object Permanence" ("Terry's Song"), the character is talking to the ghost of her brother, whom she has to eulogize, but she's having difficulty because his death was not supposed to happen. And yes, he broke the mold.

What made the evening particularly impressive is that the actors are all of college age, 18-22 years old, born around the time the reunion tour was underway. To see these undergraduates not only embrace Bruce's music but create and embody new characters that take his lyrics one step further is a real joy. And hearing the words and themes put forward in a different light brings a new appreciation to these songs.

If you are within driving distance of the Capitol Region, this performance is well worth checking out and will continue through Sunday, February 10 — see union.edufor details. 
- February 8, 2019 - reporting and photographs by Howard Kibrick

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“I’m on Fire”: Springsteen-inspired play in Production

Springsteen inspiration
for winter theater production

January 24, 201

“When the Promise Was Broken” is a collection of 13 plays inspired by the songs of Bruce Springsteen, each by a different American playwright. 

The 90-minute production pieces together nine plays in a seamless evening that celebrates the all too human experience of longing, heartbreak and promises broken in working life, relationships, families and the American dream.

Performances run at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7 through Saturday, Feb. 9 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10 in Yulman Theatre. Tickets are $10 for general admissions and $7 with a Union ID, alumni and seniors. 

“For over 45 years, Bruce Springsteen’s music, lyrics and performances have been an ongoing conversation with his audiences worldwide,” said Joan Herrington, editor of the production. 

Director Patricia Culbert, senior artist-in-residence for the College’s Theatre Department, stated: “When I first read through the plays eventually chosen for our production, I made note of the central themes, looking for the linkages.” 

“These pieces are remarkably light in touch, enormously funny in many places and recognizably human in the searching, the yearning, the need for community and hope and redemption and forgiveness and opportunity,” Culbert added. 

The plays include:  


“A Semi-Autobiographical Response to Feelings of Sexual Inadequacy Prompted by Repeatedly Listening to Bruce Springsteen’s ‘I’m On Fire’ for Four Hours Straight” by Gregory S. Moss, inspired by “I’m On Fire” 
Cast: Haoyu (John) Jiang ’21, Sarah White ’21, Sophie Hurwitz ’21 and Abdul Raafey Shoukat ‘22

“Valhalla Correctional” by Peter Ullian, inspired by “We Take Care of Our Own” 
Cast: Helen Smith ‘22 and Etienne-Marcel Giannelli ‘20

“Bloody River” by Elaine Romero, inspired by “American Skin” 
Cast: Amber Birt ‘22, Haoyu (John) Jiang ’21 and Rochelle Nuqui ‘22

“Object Permanence” by Jennifer Blackmer, inspired by “Terry’s Song” 
Cast: Dan Gottlieb ‘19 and Aly Silbey ‘20

“Drive All Night” by Steven Dietz, inspired by “Drive All Night” 
Cast: Chloe Savitch ’22, Helen Smith ’22 and Zachary Christian ‘20

“Gospel Hour” by Dan and Drew Caffrey, inspired by “State Trooper” 
Cast: Etienne- Marcel Giannelli, ’20, Aly Silbey ’20 and Rochelle Nuqui ‘22


"Merry-Go-Round Man” by Edward Baker, inspired by “Cover Me” 
Cast: Abdul Raafey Shoukat ’22, Zachary Christian ’20 and Sarah White ’21


“Pick Up Beds” by K. Frithjof Peterson, inspired by “When You’re Alone”
Cast: Chloe Savitch ’22 and Sophie Hurwitz ’21


“Glad for the Company” by Tucker Rafferty, inspired by “Nebraska” 
Cast: Emma Youmans ‘20

Box office hours are 12:30-1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and reservations can be made by calling 518-388-6545.